Tag Archives: coit tower

Highrise Residential — San Francisco’s North Beach

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One from the archives… About six months ago I spent two days with Muratore Corp, photographing one of their projects in San Francisco’s trendy North Beach neighborhood. This was one of the best projects I’ve ever shot with Muratore, and there have been a few good ones!!

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One of the great aspects of this remodel was the variety and quality of the materials. Rich wood cabinetry (Walnut and Maple), stainless steel, Carerra Marble, granite, and even Ostrich Skin all make appearances.

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One thing that made this a really interesting shoot was the fact that there were two strong elements in the place that were holdovers from the previous incarnation of the condo. In  1999, this place was “done” by Barry Brukoff, a Sausalito-based interior designer, and photographed for Architectural Digest by none other than Mary E. Nichols.

When the unit was sold around 2010, the coffee table and a set of large glass sculptural pieces (visible at the far left of the kitchen photo, above) were deemed too heavy to move, and so they stayed behind and were incorporated into the new owners’ plans. Cindy Bayon, of Muratore, did a radical renovation that included moving the fireplace, no small feat in a high-rise….

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Here are a few behind-the-scenes shots, including one of me, comparing my living room photo, with the view of Coit Tower, to Mary Nichols’.

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North Beach Roof Deck

I shot this project back in June, (click here to see the interiors) and we waited three months for the San Francisco summer fog to clear (and for our schedules to open up at the same time) to get the final (and favorite) shot: the roof deck. This is by Dumican Mosey Architects.

Biggest challenge: keeping the candles lit in the stiff wind blowing in off the ocean! In the end, it was good that they kept blowing out during the long exposures – otherwise the nice glow from the flames would have been grossly over-exposed. Sometimes things just work, even when you think they aren’t.