Tag Archives: san francisco

Modern Highrise Residential by Bayon Design Studio

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This one was a long time coming. I first scouted this project at least three years ago, while it was still a raw construction site. Located on the 45th floor of the San Francisco Millennium Tower, it was already clear that this Bayon Design Studio project was going to be special.

Designer Cindy Bayon and I visited it several times over the next couple of years while we photographed other projects of hers in the same building. She held weekly design meetings with her client and they left no detail to chance. Some major items, like the wooden Japaneses soaking tub, took months to work out.

Finally, last April, we scheduled 2 (long) days to shoot. Thanks to Bellcore Construction (builder), Defauw Design (metal fabrication), Heather Menegat (styling), and of course Cindy (everything else) for providing such an awesome project for me to photograph!

San Francisco Remodel by Regan Baker Design

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Here’s a terrific project from my friends at Regan Baker Design, in San Francisco. We spent a couple of days here with Regan and her team — here are the highlights!

….for the rest of us

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Season’s Greetings!

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Happy Holidays from Scott Hargis Photo

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New Work!

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I’ve been lazy this summer and my “New Work” schedule kind of fell by the wayside….which made it extra-hard to edit this collection! I had too many photos from too many great projects and had to cut to the bone to keep the numbers reasonable. Click the image above to see the gallery in all it’s full-screen glory!

Thanks as always to my awesome clients for designing and building such incredible spaces:

Bayon Design Studio  •  Holly Bender Interiors  •  building Lab  •  Jeff King & Co.  •   Dogtown Development  •  Leslie Arnold Architect  •  Ian Birchall & Associates  •  Bleu Leman Interiors  •  Brownhouse Design  •  Regan Baker Interiors  •  Kimberley Harrison Interiors

Cow Hollow White House by Cindy Bayon

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Back in March I spent two day with Cindy Bayon, Heather Menegat, and Muratore Corp. shooting this beautifully minimalist single family residence in San Francisco’s Cow Hollow neighborhood.

Cindy, who is now under her own nameplate, Bayon Design Studio, went with white-on-white and tons of diffused natural light. Working closely with Heather Menegat, who also styled the photoshoot, this home is nothing short of startling. One of the challenges with a space like this is creating depth and controlling color casts; we worked quite hard on some of these shots to keep things true to the actual feel of being in the space itself. In the case of the staircase shot above, we actually made this photo twice — the first attempt was close, but lacked that special “thing” I wanted. On the second day, things came together beautifully. Many thanks go to the talented Molly Mahar, who helped style as well as modeling in the photos!

 

We worked our butts off on this one – but had a good time, too. Here’s a few BTS shots — everyone wanted to take a turn on the rope swing in the home office, myself included!

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Heather styled this closet from top to bottom — that’s a lot of shoes, folks! The entire thing took her nearly two hours, start to finish.

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Tight quarters in the dressing room meant no room for fancy tripods….so I improvised with a bean bag, some kleenex, and stabilized everything with 5lbs of sand.

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Nob Hill Traditional with Muratore Corp

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It’s hard to complain when your view of the Transamerica Pyramid is so close you can’t fit the entire tower in the window.  We photographed this traditional high rise condo atop San Francisco’s Nob Hill a few weeks ago, and the images are already up on Muratore’s shiny new website. I love the way Heather prefaces each project with a black-and-white image; I often find myself converting images to B&W while shooting as it helps me focus on the composition and lines, rather than getting distracted by details.

I’m also proud that Muratore’s website is essentially a portfolio of my work; 14 of the 15 projects listed were shot by me!

Here’s a few more from this shoot — enjoy!

SF Arch Porn

While scouting shoots in San Francisco…came upon this little vignette.

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Golden Gate Awesome-ness

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Living in the Bay Area means you deal with a lot of bridges. And I don’t mean little ones like in Chicago; out here we have Bridges! Everyone’s favorite is the Golden Gate, and over the years I’ve made my share of GG photos. Here’s a sampling of my favorites!

This Morning

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(Still) on Market Street, San Francisco. Morning commute in full swing, looking for some good swooshy taillights!

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(More) Highrise Happiness from Muratore

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We wanted to relate the gorgeous art-deco grill covers to the (gorgeous) art-deco Golden Gate Bridge….but the fog did not cooperate! We watched all day and shot this when things were best, but still no bridge… Still: how do you not plant a human being in that chair?! Had to do it! The biggest lighting challenge with this shot was making sure the chrome features of the grill “popped” appropriately, which meant giving them something bright to reflect.

We’ve shot several projects with Muratore this summer, so here’s another; this art-deco inspired condo atop San Francisco’s Nob Hill.

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I loved the way the aggressively patterned floor carried through to the grid of the San Francisco streets far below.

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Maple burlwood veneer coupled with black granite countertops (and black acrylic cabinets) make for a dramatic yet inviting kitchen.

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We couldn’t resist this hallway shot, featuring the astonishing Egyptian-motif doors! The “Indiana Jones” fedora was a last-minute addition…

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Client: Muratore Corp.
Interior Design: Tammi Bates
Styling: Heather Menegat
Photo Assist: Alan Vance

Nob Hill (San Francisco) Elegance

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More Muratore goodness today, with a project I first scouted last year but only shot last month — high atop San Francisco’s Nob Hill.

Venetian plaster, white oak floors, handsome laminated wood columns, marble floor inlays, and some striking vertical stripes in the kitchen woodwork made this space exciting to shoot — lots to work with! Full write-up, LOTS of photos, and Behind-the-Scenes, click here.

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At Pier 24, San Francisco. (iPhone)

North Beach Residence by Muratore Corp

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It took quite a bit of effort to get this shot lit. Balancing the exposure for the dazzling light high above San Francisco looking out towards the Golden Gate Bridge and the Pacific Ocean, while still showcasing the dark wood cabinetry, was a challenge. We kept the illusion that everything is motivated by the windows that wrap around the living room in the background; there are multiple strobes and hotlights placed for this photo.

I’m always grateful to work with someone who is willing to be adventurous in the styling, and when it works, it works well. In this shoot of a San Francisco highrise condo (in North Beach), we purposely added some “sloppy” notes — the carelessly draped dishcloth, the slightly disheveled napkins — and implied an eat-in kitchen with the discordant radishes-and-tomato bowls. It’s a way of adding interest and meaning to a photo, without triggering the wrong response; if those had been bowls of steaming hot beef stew, you might get stuck in your reaction to beef stew (whatever that is) and never get the real point of photo, which is the design and cabinetry. But who has a pre-programmed reaction to raw radishes and tomatoes? You might well have a WTF moment, but that’s cool with me; I’ve kept your attention for an extra few seconds and hopefully made you notice a few other things along the way.

The casual elements also lend a bit of life to an interiors photo, which can all too easily be sterile. Adding a live human to the mix is even more tricky — we’re hard-wired to look at each other, so that figure is sure to be a focal point, even if it’s blurry and in the background.

We also made a more “traditional” kitchen shot, below:

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With almost all the “natural” light sources controlled, we were left with the VERY bright (and un-dimmable) under-cabinets fluorescents to contend with. We effectively dimmed them using a technique Alan calls “Dummy-Dimming” in which he flips the lights on (or off) at a precise moment during a long exposure.

The second element of this project was this stunning bath, located just off of the large entry foyer.

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This shot presented several challenges. The backlit mirror, strong downlighting on the vanity top (from the ceiling spots) and the delicate sconces all had to be controlled and brought into a balance the camera could handle. I also wanted to clarify the shapes and geometry of the space, since they’re so integral to the design. Nearly every surface visible in this shot has its own light, each tuned to create the 3-dimensionality we wanted to emphasize. The blurred figure in the mirror is actually out in the foyer; his posture echoes the the shape of the sconce, his shirt works with the color scheme, his motion brings your eye back into the center of the image. I allowed the distant foyer to go slightly bluer to create a pleasing effect that emphasizes the separateness of that space.

In this unbelievable bath, we wanted to do two things; make sure that the viewer understood what was happening in the mirror, and give the eye a focal point that kept the eye in the middle of the photo. The walls of this room are venetian plaster; but in this case it’s been hand-tooled by an artist to mimic alligator skin. I’ve never seen anything like it. The designer had two words for this: “It’s expensive.”

And worth it — this bath was really amazing. The cube & slab design elements (check out the sconce lights) go together with mathematical precision, which I tried to bring out with my composition, and the wall treatment echoes the texture of the stone. Beautiful.

The detail shot below shows the plaster even more clearly, as well as the angular sink:

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SF Infinity Condo, by Muratore Corp.

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Carefully hidden lighting brings this interior up to match the exterior brightness, while maintaining the illusion that all of the light pours in through the wrap-around windows.

Several weeks ago I shot my first project in San Francisco’s Infinity Towers, a minimalist condo with killer views of the Bay Bridge, One Rincon, and (eventually) the Transbay Tower and complex.

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A mirrored cabinet hints at the scene outside, while the clean minimal aesthetic of the interior is summed up perfectly with this vignette.

With it’s subdued color palette and comfortable but not excessive furnishings, this space was an interesting challenge, photographically. I emphasized the geometry and clean, crisp feeling of the place, while showing off the view and staying (mostly) true to the owner’s aesthetic.

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An over-dyed and mottled round rug emphasizes the curved outer wall, and helps partition the living room in this open floor plan.

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Muratore will custom design and fabricate pretty much anything, including this counterweight for an armchair head pillow.

The Murphy bed in the spare bedroom was a Muratore custom build, and I loved the way it, and the sconce lamps above the built-in, mirrored the dense urban construction scene outside.

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These wall-mounted storage shelves/cabinets deserved special attention, and we spent the better part of an hour getting the light perfect to show off the shapes and tones properly.

San Francisco Loft by Muratore Corp

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Muratore Corp. is best known for its work in San Francisco highrises, especially the Millenium, but also in the Infinity Towers and many more scattered across Nob Hill, Russian Hill, and other neighborhoods.

So this project was different: a ground-floor loft in a brick-and-timber structure in the South of Market, just a few blocks away from the rarified air of the SF Millenium Tower.

I photographed this loft in April, and knew that the images had to convey the real feeling of this place, which is at once industrial and yet also beautiful. The dark ironwork (and “built” pieces that match that patina) are offset by the amber glow of the timber and brick, and the huge windows on two sides let light pour in from the street.

Too much light, actually, and we had to get creative to control it. We used many yards of black cloth in this loft! Many more photos, write-up, and some behind-the-scenes pics, click here!

San Francisco Residence by Leslie Arnold Architecture

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Leslie Arnold Architecture brought me into this outstanding midcentury-esque residence in San Francisco a few weeks ago, to document the extensive remodel they did.

Leslie did a complete remodel of this 1959 structure, top to bottom, and the really remarkable thing was that she did it for an astounding $150/sq. ft.  — which is really, really inexpensive. Green materials were used extensively, there’s natural ventilation drawn through the house from the front end windows and up through a large operable skylight at the rear. Solar panels were installed on the roof, and radiant floor heating added. A bearing wall was removed from the living room to create a large open space, which involved new truss joists spanning the entire width of the house to transfer the load to the exterior walls.

The west wall is floor to ceiling glass, and the light pours through it like a tangible force.

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That light, combined with frequent skylights and a translucent lightwell mean that you would never need artificial lighting during daytime hours. This place GLOWS.

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Leslie designed a kitchen that responds beautifully to this flood of light. Back-painted glass backsplashes, white composite countertops, and clean, simple lines give it a light and airy feeling.

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Design in the bathrooms follows the kitchen’s lead — with the addition of gloss-finshed cabinetry fronts and excellent storage solutions.

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A pocket door separates the foyer from the steps leading up to the main level. In the background is the family room and an excavated  level-out backyard that’s now being landscaped — a future photoshoot!This is a stunning project, both in terms of the finished result and the design work that went into it — I was thrilled to photograph it!

GitHub.com by Pfau Long Architecture

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A few weeks ago I spent a couple of days working with Pfau Long Architecture shooting their latest project, the GitHub.com headquarters in (where else) San Francisco’s SoMa district. This building is owned by Hudson Pacific Properties, which manages buildings throughout the West Coast.

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A project this size has a lot of players, and Pfau Long’s role was primarily on the outside of the building, including the facade, entries, structural work, and a truly spectacular roof deck. SoMa (South of Market) is a wonderful mix of old masonry warehouse and industrial structures alongside some of the most exciting new construction anywhere. The Millenium Tower is here, as well as the future Transbay Tower which will be the tallest building in San Francisco.

Click the link…

More photos and write-up after the jump!