Tag Archives: architect

Mid-Century remodel by building Lab

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A few weeks ago I met architect Stephen Shoup of building Lab in San Francisco to photograph a new residential project. Stephen’s work has a very strong character that makes it instantly recognizable, but it also evolves over time, which is absolutely fascinating, and challenging, from a photographic standpoint.

For example, check out this stairwell:

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And then compare it to this one I shot for Stephen back in 2013:

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Natural wood, check. The thin metal rods that serve as a partial wall have morphed into high-tension wire, but the motif remains the same. Both stairwells have very strong graphical lines and both “make a statement” rather than receding into the background.

And this stairwell came with a little something extra…a playspace for the resident kid!

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I could’ve spent the rest of the day doing nothing but composing shots on this structure, but we did have a few other things to shoot:

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All in all, a fun day! More building Lab projects coming up, so don’t touch that dial!

GitHub.com by Pfau Long Architecture

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A few weeks ago I spent a couple of days working with Pfau Long Architecture shooting their latest project, the GitHub.com headquarters in (where else) San Francisco’s SoMa district. This building is owned by Hudson Pacific Properties, which manages buildings throughout the West Coast.

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A project this size has a lot of players, and Pfau Long’s role was primarily on the outside of the building, including the facade, entries, structural work, and a truly spectacular roof deck. SoMa (South of Market) is a wonderful mix of old masonry warehouse and industrial structures alongside some of the most exciting new construction anywhere. The Millenium Tower is here, as well as the future Transbay Tower which will be the tallest building in San Francisco.

Click the link…

More photos and write-up after the jump!

San Francisco Residential by Baran Studios

Baran_ark Matt Baran (Baran Studio Architects) has been killing it lately! Between some fantastic residential work in Oakland’s “Bordertown” neighborhood that recently won a Citation Award at the East Bay AIA Awards (with photos by yours truly) to the WordPress campus that got the attention of the industry, Matt is really on a roll.

Which brings us to this most recent project in San Francisco’s Potrero Hill neighborhood. Matt re-designed the structure and added a pop-out bay window that has real chutzpah!

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San Francisco Residential by Andrew Morrall Architect

morrall_small03When superior architecture meets fine craftsmanship, you get the raw material for great photographs. So when architect Andrew Morrall asked me to shoot a new residential remodel that featured the cabinetry work of Hendrik Furhmeister, I knew from the first look that this would be a winner. More photos, more words, after the jump

Automattic San Francisco, by Baran Studios

MBA_Back in early June I photographed the offices of Automattic.com, which among other things is the parent company of WordPress, Gravatar, PollDaddy, and Akismet (this is a WordPress blog, in case that matters to you).

I’ve worked with architect Matt Baran (Baran Studio) on many residential projects but this was the first commercial space I’d worked on with him. Matt’s task here was to create a space in this former industrial building located in San Francisco’s SoMA district that could accommodate the usual contingent of maybe 15 or 20 people, but also (at a moment’s notice) swallow, say, a few  hundred coders that might be called in for a special project, or an event. There are less than 200 employees overall, scattered across the globe, but they never know when they’re going to have a short-term blitz of activity.

MBA_-9Matt took cues from the wood trusses of the building’s bow ceilings, added some ironwork and lighting, and then softened the whole space with wood-slat panels that partition off areas, add warmth and color, and function acoustically as well.

MBA_-2The result is a space that feels cavernous, but not cold, and doesn’t echo. Automattic, like many tech companies, has it’s quirks, and ping-pong is certainly one of them. The exact function of the weather balloons was a bit more mysterious, but we sure had a good time moving them around and positioning them where we wanted for each shot!

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We shot until just after midnight and came away with a pretty good set of photos of a very cool project — enjoy!

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San Francisco Kitchen & Bath: Leslie Arnold, Part Two

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A few posts back, I chronicled a recent shoot with architect Leslie Arnold – a kitchen/bath remodel in San Francisco. Today, here’s another one, with a distinctly different flavor.

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Unlike the other project, which was a sort of Victorian-meets-country blend, this was Mission all the way. Arched doorways, stucco, smallish rooms….and Leslie introduced an Arts & Crafts flavor to the kitchen.

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For the lighting geeks: The shot above involved gelling all the under-cabinet lights minus green (or magenta) to bring the fluorescent tubes back to something close to daylight. We introduced some flash from the left side down near the fridge, and there’s also continuous light in the rear left corner as well as the foreground. A lot of careful positioning of cards and some white reflectors got everything under control.

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With the kitchen done, we moved into the bath, where Leslie had cast off all pretense of Mission style and gone 100% contemporary. This is the epitome of crisp! Green glass tile, white CeasarStone vanity top, and rich wood cabinets. The little scrubby was a last-minute addition to the styling that I just couldn’t resist.

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All in all this was a really satisfying project to shoot, thanks to Leslie’s great work and some excellent collaborative atmosphere.

San Francisco Kitchen & Bath: Leslie Arnold, Part Two

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A few posts back, I chronicled a recent shoot with architect Leslie Arnold – a kitchen/bath remodel in San Francisco. Today, here’s another one, with a distinctly different flavor.

LA_Blog_-2

Unlike the other project, which was a sort of Victorian-meets-country blend, this was Mission all the way. Arched doorways, stucco, smallish rooms….and Leslie introduced an Arts & Crafts flavor to the kitchen.

LA_Blog_-1

For the lighting geeks: The shot above involved gelling all the under-cabinet lights minus green (or magenta) to bring the fluorescent tubes back to something close to daylight. We introduced some flash from the left side down near the fridge, and there’s also continuous light in the rear left corner as well as the foreground. A lot of careful positioning of cards and some white reflectors got everything under control.

LA_Blog_-4

With the kitchen done, we moved into the bath, where Leslie had cast off all pretense of Mission style and gone 100% contemporary. This is the epitome of crisp! Green glass tile, white CeasarStone vanity top, and rich wood cabinets. The little scrubby was a last-minute addition to the styling that I just couldn’t resist.

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All in all this was a really satisfying project to shoot, thanks to Leslie’s great work and some excellent collaborative atmosphere.

San Francisco Kitchen & Bath by Leslie Arnold

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I recently completed a couple of projects with architect Leslie Arnold; a pair of kitchen/bath remodels in San Francisco. Here’s the first one, and it was a real pleasure to shoot!

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Nor was it simple. The atrium-like eating area at the rear was flooded with sunlight, but the center island and “cooking” end of the space was significantly darker, and had to be lit in order for the photos to match what our eyes experienced. There’s a mixture of strobe and continuous light being applied across the entire image. Some of the strobe was via a head mounted on a light stand that was then “boomed” out the window of an adjoining room, by my assistant!

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In the bathroom, we again used a combination of flash (this time a small speedlight) and continuous light (for the cabinetry) to compress the dynamic range into something that matched what our eyes could see.

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We wrapped up the day with a few detail shots in other areas of the house where Leslie had done work, including the bedroom closets and storage.

Up next: a completely different kitchen/bath look, also by Leslie Arnold! Stay tuned….

San Francisco Kitchen & Bath by Leslie Arnold

LA_Blog_01

I recently completed a couple of projects with architect Leslie Arnold; a pair of kitchen/bath remodels in San Francisco. Here’s the first one, and it was a real pleasure to shoot!

LA_Blog_02

Nor was it simple. The atrium-like eating area at the rear was flooded with sunlight, but the center island and “cooking” end of the space was significantly darker, and had to be lit in order for the photos to match what our eyes experienced. There’s a mixture of strobe and continuous light being applied across the entire image. Some of the strobe was via a head mounted on a light stand that was then “boomed” out the window of an adjoining room, by my assistant!

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In the bathroom, we again used a combination of flash (this time a small speedlight) and continuous light (for the cabinetry) to compress the dynamic range into something that matched what our eyes could see.

LA_Blog_05

We wrapped up the day with a few detail shots in other areas of the house where Leslie had done work, including the bedroom closets and storage.

Up next: a completely different kitchen/bath look, also by Leslie Arnold! Stay tuned….

Mid-Century Modern, Revised: Leslie Arnold Architect

I was really pleased to get to shoot this updated mid-century in San Francisco’s North Beach neighborhood (my favorite ‘hood in SF) a few weeks ago. Architect Leslie Arnold and General Contractor Steve Altman retained the classic lines and character of the space but created a light airy feeling that seems totally up-to-date.

We had planned to wrap the shoot around 5:00pm, but after seeing the private courtyard above I knew that it simply HAD to be a twilight photo. We spent the next couple of hours setting this up. There’s some added light pretty much everywhere, inside and outside, which kept me and Alan pretty busy. As the time drew near, we sketched out where we wanted our models (Leslie, and the homeowners, who are both in the design/architecture field themselves). Then came the patient waiting, then the frantic last-minute tweaking….until voila! The perfect moment.

Here’s a few more from this shoot. Enjoy!

Classic Mid-Century Modern For Sale

Earlier this year I was fortunate to team up again with Quentin Bacon on another Michael Thompson (Sotheby’s International) real estate project — this one in Orinda, California.

92 Sandhill, Orinda, CA Full write-up, video, and photos after the jump!

This Week in Photos: June 24, 2011

It’s all one house, this week: everything else pales in comparison to this Richard Janzen contemporary I shot in the Oakland hills. I felt like a kid in a candy store – amazing compositions everywhere, and the art on the walls was pretty outrageous, too. Don’t miss the Warhol over the fireplace…

see the rest of the set, after the jump

Modern Kitchen by Andrew Morrall & Houseworks


They don’t get much more clean and crisp than this, folks.

A few weeks ago I worked with architect Andrew Morrall to shoot this kitchen, and an adjacent bath, built by Jeff Kann at Houseworks, in San Francisco. We identified 5 or 6 unique compositions, and I riffed on each of them, eventually piling up over 20 photos! With all of these angles and shapes, the possibilities were nearly endless. more photos after the jump

Modern Kitchen by Andrew Morrall & Houseworks


They don’t get much more clean and crisp than this, folks.

A few weeks ago I worked with architect Andrew Morrall to shoot this kitchen, and an adjacent bath, built by Jeff Kann at Houseworks, in San Francisco. We identified 5 or 6 unique compositions, and I riffed on each of them, eventually piling up over 20 photos! With all of these angles and shapes, the possibilities were nearly endless. more photos after the jump